Why Online Courses Are the New Fool’s Gold

Krista Mollion
5 min readDec 7, 2019

Before you buy another online course, read this.

Photo: istock

I know my opinion will be controversial but I just have to be honest.

Online courses have gotten out of hand.

An increasingly popular scheme are coaches teaching employees the way to quit their 9 to 5 jobs is to transfer their knowledge into a sort of powerpoint, set up a fancy spamming system with persuasive copy, and watch the cash roll in. And not only employees: Stay-at-home parents, the unemployed, and the very young are being swept up by the course craze too.

It is sad to see there is no online vetting system for courses. We need an independant website for unbias, anynomous reviews with proof of course receipt required to publish any review.

Also, there is no mandatory accreditation agency for online courses so anyone can publish an online course anytime about anything and sell it any and every way for any price they chose. It is the Wild West!

People with zero training in instructional design, teaching, nor marketing are selling VERY various levels of knowledge packaged into these “courses”.

The results are catastrophic. Bad courses are everywhere!

And it is just the beginning. In 2020, I foresee the numbers will continue to explode. Sadly, there is even no way to get accurate statistics on online courses because there is no official central agency overseeing them but it feels like new course platforms are popping up every day, churning out an endless supply of bad courses.

The price points are across the board too. I’ve seen anything from a $3 course to a $10,000 course!

Because the courses are behind a paywall, you really don’t know what you are getting until you purchase the course. And they are usually shrouded in hype and mystery. It’s a seduction game and desperate people looking to “make 6 figures from home” are easy prey. Psychological manipulation tools and fancy tech are geared to create credibility (many testimonials, nice display layout with large, colorful copy and an attractive coach), a sense of urgency (countdown clocks), a false sense of savings (prices slashed by half if you purchase with the clock ticking), and…

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Krista Mollion

IEx-Agency For Top Iconic Brands Turned Fractional CMO + Educator for Small Business To Go From Semi-Invisible To Un-Ignorable